Basic Blog with Svelte Kit

April 16

SvelteBlog

1 - What is SvelteKit

SvelteKit is a hybrid of what was svelte and sapper

SvelteKit is a framework for building web applications of all sizes, with a beautiful development experience and flexible filesystem-based routing.

Unlike single-page apps, SvelteKit doesn't compromise on SEO, progressive enhancement or the initial load experience — but unlike traditional server-rendered apps, navigation is instantaneous for that app-like feel.

2 - Getting Started with SvelteKit

Initialize the app onto your machine npm init svelte@next my-blog Follow the prompts for the values you would like to use. I’m choosing to NOT use typescript for this one I am choosing to use ESLint and Prettier Change into the directory of the new app you just created cd my-app Install all the node modules npm install Open up the site npm run dev -- --open

Going forward, we will put everything in the src folder

3 - Create A Page

routes/contact.svelte — new file

<svelte:head>
    <title>Contact Me</title>
</svelte:head>

<h1>Contact!</h1>

<a href="https://twitter.com/rgottleber">My Twitter</a>

Nothing shows up … yet

lib/Nav/index.svelte — New file and directory

<ul>
    <li><a href="/">Home</a></li>
    <li><a href="/contact">Contact</a></li>
</ul>

Create a layout file for our app.

Anytime there is a file with a $ it won’t create a route routes/$layout.svelte

<script>
    import Nav from '$lib/Nav/index.svelte';
</script>

<Nav />

<main>
    <slot />
</main>

<slot /> is where the content of the page slots in. $lib is defined in jsconfig.json

This creates the page and adds a nav element to all of your pages. At this point we have a functional site with the worlds most amazing lack of CSS. I’m not planning on adding css in this explainer but I will add a a tiny bit just to illustrate how scoped CSS works in Svelte. Let’s make Contact! Look awesome

<svelte:head>
    <title>Contact Me</title>
</svelte:head>

<h1>Contact!</h1>

<a href="https://twitter.com/rgottleber">My Twitter</a>

<style>
    h1 {
        text-align: center;
        text-decoration: underline;
        font-size: 32px;
        font-family: monospace;
        letter-spacing: 5px;
        background: linear-gradient(to right, #6666ff, #0099ff, #00ff00, #ff3399, #6666ff);
        -webkit-background-clip: text;
        background-clip: text;
        color: transparent;
        animation: rainbow_animation 6s ease-in-out infinite;
        background-size: 400% 100%;
    }

    @keyframes rainbow_animation {
        0%,
        100% {
            background-position: 0 0;
        }
        50% {
            background-position: 100% 0;
        }
    }
</style>

This style will only apply to the h1 on the contact page.

<h1 class="s-8jg-3RXHNduc">Contact!</h1>

Svelte creates a class just for our h1, SWEET!

4 - Create A Post

Create a directory to hold posts posts Also, you need to create your first post.

posts/hello-world.md

---
title: 'Hello World'
slug: 'hello-world'
---

# Hello to the World

This is my first blog post!

The bit between the two --- is known as front matter. In order to use that, and markdown you will need to add a couple npm packages

npm install -D marked gray-matter

marked — converts markdown to html gray-matter — grabs the front matter for use later.

Perfect, you now have a post and we need to read it.

5 - Create the blog page

Svelte-Kit uses the routes folder to create pages as you saw when creating the contact.svelte route. A file called either src/routes/about.svelte or src/routes/about/index.svelte would correspond to the /about route.

Understanding this you are going to need a few routes for the blog. First you need to create blog/index.svelte this will correspond to the /blog route

Let’s keep it basic to begin.

<h1>Blog Posts</h1>

How can you get there? You need to update your <Nav /> component

<ul>
    <li><a href="/">Home</a></li>
    <li><a href="/contact">Contact</a></li>
    <li><a href="/blog">Blog</a></li>
</ul>

A quick save and everything is up to date. The fast reload is 🤌 chef’s kiss

The blog isn’t very interesting yet, you will need to create an endpoint for the post data. Don’t worry endpoint is a fancy term for modules living in .js or .ts files.

You will need to gather all the markdown content from the posts directory. The common way to do this is create a matching .json.js for your .svelte file.

blog/index.json.js

import path from 'path';
import fs from 'fs';
import grayMatter from 'gray-matter';

function getAllPosts(filesPath) {
// Read all posts from passed in path and itterate the .md files just in case
  const posts = fs.readdirSync(filesPath).filter(file => file.endsWith('.md')).map((fileName) => {
    // Read each post
    const post = fs.readFileSync(path.resolve(filesPath, fileName), 'utf-8');
    // grayMatter pulls out the front matter into {data}
    const { data } = grayMatter(post);
    return {
        ...data,
      };
  });
  return posts;
}
 

export function get() {
  const posts = getAllPosts('src/posts');
  return { body: posts }
}

This will get you all of the blog posts, and their data.

You’ll need to show what you’ve got now. Let’s update blog/index.svelte

<script context="module">
    export async function load({ fetch }) {
        const result = await fetch('blog.json');
        const posts = await result.json();
        return {
            props: { posts }
        };
    }
</script>

<script>
    export let posts = [];
</script>

<h1>Blog Posts</h1>
{#each posts as post}
    <h1>
        <a href="/blog/{post.slug}">{post.title}</a>
    </h1>
{/each}

This will also link to the blog post based on the slug from the front matter.

6 - Create the post page

Again, let’s start with the data.

Inside the blog directory you need to create [slug].json.js This is a great time to introduce the idea of Dynamic Parameters anything enclosed in [brackets] is a dynamic parameter. You’ll be accessing it through the load function.

import path from 'path';
import fs from 'fs';
import marked from 'marked';
import grayMatter from 'gray-matter';

function getPost(slug) {
// Read the post from passed in slug
    const post = fs.readFileSync(path.resolve('src/posts', `${slug}.md`), 'utf-8');
    // grayMatter pulls out the front matter into {data}
    const { data, content } = grayMatter(post);
    // Markdown to HTML renderer
    const renderer = new marked.Renderer();
    // Render the HTML from the content of the MD post
    const html = marked(content, { renderer });
    return {
        html,
        ...data,
      };
}
 

export function get(_req) {
    const { slug } = _req.params;
    const post = getPost(slug);
    return { body: post }
}

And display that data

<script context="module">
    // Use the load funciton to get the fetch and page
    export async function load({ fetch, page }) {
        // slug comes from page
        const { slug } = page.params;
        // async so we actually fetch the json
        // -- this comes from [slug].json.js
        const result = await fetch(`${slug}.json`);
        // get the post and use it as the page props
        const post = await result.json();
        return {
            props: { post }
        };
    }
</script>

<script>
    export let post;
</script>

<h1>{post.title}</h1>
{@html post.html}

7 - Profit?

At this point you have a fully functional blog that you can host or deploy as you like. It renders out markdown into the most amazing un-styled CSS

Congratulations!🥳